Welcome to www.tendlife.com !!!

puppy having problems with back legs

Question:
Hi again! This is going to be difficult to explain, but here it goes...

I have a petty active puppy (8mth old husky mix), but not too bad since neutering (In November 06). He can go outside and run around until his hearts content. What I find strange is that, when he wakes up from a nap, and goes to stand up, it's like he has a hard time getting his back legs up. Like a really old dog looks when they have to get up. He doesn't appear to be limping or anything, nor does he seem to be in pain (and believe me, he's a very vocal dog...if he were in pain, we'd know it!). Once he's up, he fine. Can jump on the couch no problem (he's not a small dog, but not big - about 30 lbs). I felt all around his hind legs and hips, and he didn't cry in pain or anything. Like I said, then he can run around in the back yard right after, no problems.

About 2 weeks ago, my husband had him out on a big walk on a woods road, where he was running through deep snow, and he appeared kinda still for a day or 2 after that. But it's since then that I have noticed this thing with getting up.

He has had numerous slips on the hardwood floor and has fallen a bunch of times. It seems like he can't get his grip, like he walks on his nails!

Could this be something as simple as a sore muscle? I can't see it being too serious as he has no other difficulties once he is standing.

I also wondered if it had something to do with the nuetering. I remember for the couple of days after he was doing this funny thing where he would walk funny and pull his bum in. It was strange. He jumped up on the couch right after his surgery, and I know he wasn't supposed to, but he snuck up there.

Otherwise, he seems fine. Poops normal and pee's normal. I tend to be an over-eacter, and a worrier, but I don't want to rush to the vet for every little thing.

Any ideas?? (sorry this is so long!)

Nikki

Answer:
I don't really have any ideas for you, but I would be concerned about his hip structure. Since it has been going on for awhile, I would have a vet take a look and maybe do x-rays to see if there is anything going on with the hip joints.

Answer:
Definitely see a vet about it. It may be just growing pains or a pull that has not healed fully and the dog is reinjuring it. There are many things this could be. Get a check up first you will probably need xrays and also take a stools sample so you do not have to go back with one and if not needed at least you were prepared. Good luck and keep us posted

Answer:
I know a dog who went into the vet because it looked like his lower leg was turned out.

He had no difficulty moving, playing, getting up and was in no pain. They had him checked and it turns out his lower leg was deformed but they also found out he had hip displasia in both hips.

Answer:
I'd definately get him xrayed, you never know.
I too think hip problems, perhaps early displaysia not only large dogs have this problem, sometimes its in the genetics. *If* displaysia is the culprit in this case, its better to start treatments and supplimenting early on.
Its so hard to watch a dog suffering from severe hip Displaysia, I wish that I could have started mine on medications and suppliments years ago, ( but he wasnt my dog then)
Please have this checked out, hopefully its nothing too severe , actually i hope its just growing issues. But its better to know than to speculate.

Answer:
OMG! Could this seriously be hip dysplaysia?? He's only 8 months old? I was just reading up on that, and he does have the symptoms. Is this serious?????I will get him to the vet soon.

Nikki

Answer:
I would get it checked sooner than later. If you suspect that something could seriously be wrong I would get some pet insurance before going in and having it documented. Make sure that it covers things like hip displasia otherwise it won't help. Also check to see what the activation period is for coverage. Surgery is very costly and may be a better option than trying to control it with supplements. As your pup gets older the success rate for such surgeries begins to decrease because of where the dog is with growth.
The cost for hips is 3-5 thousand a hip.

Answer:
Yeah pet insurance before it goes on record may be something to look in to

Answer:
I would start researching pet insurance immediately. Would not bother looking at Vet Insurance (I have this plan - and it most definitely does not cover hip dysplasia, period). I knew this going in, but Plan suited our needs more than others. My 22 lb. small standard Eskimo has a slight risk of dysplasia so am hopeful it won't happen. You will definitely need to wait out the "wait period" before your vet sees the dog. Unless of course your dog just can't get up, then you would have no choice. Hope this does not happen.

Answer:
It may not be hip displaysia but it could be.
Definately get some coverage. I did not for my dog and now that it is pre-diagnosed there is no way i can get any coverage for Puppy.
Pet health insurance is a great thing to have and i couldnt imagine owning pets with out it now.
I use petplan and they have been wonderful, whether it was quill removal, emergency surgeries or even death, they have been super speedy in reimbursing me. Never had a problem.
Do look into some form of insurance, save so much in the end.

Answer:
Hunter's owner...being from Newfoundland, do you know where I could even begin to look for pet insurance?

I have been soooo stressed out about this and I didn't sleep a wink last night. Finn was outside playing last night and later when he came in and went for a nap, after he got up, he was walking funny, like he was favoring one rear leg. Maybe this could be an injury? See, we got him from the SPCA. He was a stray found wandering in a small community and was ~3 months old when we got him in August. I don't know what happened to him before he came into my life.

He has brought so much to my life, that the thought that there could be something wrong with him at such a young age is devestating!

Thanks for your help and advise. I'll keep you posted.

Nikki

Answer:
There are a couple of different ones. I am not sure which one is the best.

It could very well be an injury that hasn't healed yet and lets hope that thats all it is

I will do a little bit of reading and see what I come up with in regard to pet insurance. Also I am sure there are others here that can advise you where to look. Many people don't bother with insurance but instead put so much aside in a seperate bank account every so often to have there for such cases.

Answer:
Hi everyone. I have looked at a number of vet insurance plans online, and each one of them have a 21 day waiting period before I can get Finn examined. I don't want to wait that long. He appears to be getting worse, so I want to get him to the vet soon. I am still hoping that it is not anything serious I am under to much stress right now, and I want to get him looked at right away. I'll deal with the vet bills later.

Thanks again.

Nikki

Answer:
Do you have a good relationship with your vet? If so, discuss the pet insurance and documentation.

Answer:
Originally Posted by nikkiandfinn
Hi everyone. I have looked at a number of vet insurance plans online, and each one of them have a 21 day waiting period before I can get Finn examined. I don't want to wait that long. He appears to be getting worse, so I want to get him to the vet soon. I am still hoping that it is not anything serious I am under to much stress right now, and I want to get him looked at right away. I'll deal with the vet bills later.

Thanks again.

Nikki

I would feel the same as you. When Hunter had a slight CCL tear, we thought about pet insurance but instead we wanted to get it seen to right away, hoping that it wasn't serious enough for surgery. Luckily it wasn't, but waiting was not an option. Now we have money put aside in case of emergencies with him or Cassie.

Answer:
Good luck at the vet Please keep us posted!

Answer:
You know best when it comes to your pup. If you feel this is something you can't wait on then take him in to be seen. I hope it is nothing serious, good luck.

Answer:
I'm bringing Finn to the vet this afternoon. Same thing yesterday. Went outside for a run, came in and lay down, when the time came to get up, he had to pull himself up. And he seemed to be limping a little on his rear left leg. Could be an injured muscle that hasn't healed yet, right? If this is hip dysplasia...could this be life threatening? Will it shorten his life span? I am really stressing out here.

Nikki

Answer:
Hi, Nikki. I know exactly what you're going through, but take a deep breath, let it out slowly and relax a bit. This could be a lot of things! It could be a sprain or a strain (treatable with rest and maybe meds), it could be a tick-borne disease (treatable by antibiotics), it could be hip dysplasia, or it could be something totally different... Doesn't pay to worry until you know for sure.

However, through personal experience I can tell you that hip dysplasia is not a death sentence. It can be pricey to treat, but there are so many more options out there for it than there were even 20 years ago. Diet, exercise, weight-control are all helpful in stabilizing the joints to mitigate arthritic changes. Chondroitin/glucosamine supplements are very helpful, too. (Of the 5 dogs we've treated with it for various joint problems, 4 of them have shown marked improvement...that's an 80% success rate! Not bad! ) And there are surgical options open that are pricey, but very successful.

We adopted a 5-year-old springer spaniel with such severe hip dysplasia that the vets were surprised she could walk. She'd thrown her weight forward for so many years to keep stress off her hips that she'd blown some disks in her back, as well. She had a total bilateral hip replacement and had her back fixed and subsequently died of unrelated causes at the age of 15. At 11, she was playing chase with our 11-week-old puppy in the backyard!

I won't kid you--it was pricey. Back then (in the early 90s) it was $2200 (US) apiece for the hips and another $1800 for the back, plus 22 weeks of keeping her quiet (no jumping, no running, no furniture). It was hard, but the improvement was immediate! If this looks like something that might become necessary in the future, start a savings account for it now.

So even cases of severe dysplasia are not a death sentence--and Finn may have something different. Good luck at your vet appointment--don't be afraid to ask lots of questions while there and we'll be here when you get back. *deep breath* *relax*

Answer:
Well, I'm back from the vet, and I am no better informed than when I went.

Firstly...I should tell you that Finn is a VERY timid puppy, and doesn't like to be touched (I suspect that he was abused before we got him). Therefore, the vet could not do a good examination of him, because he would not let her go near him. Hence, an x-ray while he is awake is never going to happen.

So, she told me that he is definatly sore, there is no doubt. She said that I should rest him for the next 2 weeks (no walks, no jumping in deep snow - which Finn LOVES!!!, get mats for the house so that he's not walking on the hardwood and at risk for slipping, and only outside to do his buisness). That's the only way to know if he is injured, becasue he should be much better in 2 weeks if it's an ingury. If he's not better, then I have to bring him back in for a day, have him put to sleep to have the x-rays done. That will be the only way to settle him. That way, she can get a REALLY good pictures of the x-ray.

We talked about hip dysplasia. She said that it is not uncommom for young dogs to show signs of it, but medical treatment usually works well. If he does have it, it means that he will be on meds for the rest of his life (FYI, if he needed surgery, they don't even do hip surgeries in newfoundland. He would need to go to PEI). But I won't worry about that right now

So, that's the story. I am still very woried about him, but I guess I can only do what she suggests and take it from there. Thanks for your support guys. I will definatly keep you posted.

Nikki

Answer:
Thanks for the update. Hopefully the 2 weeks of resting will take care of it for good.

Just a comment, did the vet suggest a seddation for x-ray rather than full anesthesia? My Cassie is the most timid thing I have ever seen when it comes to strangers, and shivers at the vet for the whole appointment. She had to have x-rays this summer on her lungs, and sedation was used...Just something to keep in mind...

Answer:
Hope that the rest period helps. I know how hard it is to keep puppy down. After my 2 mini Dachshunds had full neck/back surgery - and started to regain feeling - it was a nightmare. While at vets they were moved to increasingly smaller cages to restrict movement. When they came home, I had not crate them - and these dogs were never crated at home. Had the crate on the bed - one actually had his less brilliant brother open the latch and shoved him in - while he sauntered off in search of food. But it paid off, until backs finally went. Make sure no stairs. If problem is not hip dysplasia, perhaps ask your vet if it could be a disc problem - not necessarily calcified discs pressing on the spine - but disc related. This would require treatment by a neuro, as opposed to an ortho which you would need for the dysplasia. If it turns out that your pup does not have hip dysplasia, Cruciate Ligament or Pateller Luxation, I would sign him up for pet insurance a.s.a.p. after vet gives clean bill of health - and then start counting the days.

Answer:
Hi everyone. Just wanted to give a little update on Finn. I have been trying desperately to keep him rested...impossible!!! I took him out side last night for a pee, and he went off running through the deep snow in the backyard! It's like a drug and he just has to have a hit!!! I yelled at him to come back, and he looked at me with these sad eyes, but reluctently returned.

Anyway, he seems to be showing some minor improvement. He doesn't seem to be as stiff, but still a little. Still a little difficult time getting up in the mornings, but I really think that this could be partly laziness, because if he hears something that he wants to investigate, he gets up a lot quicker!

I will continue to wait until next week (that will be 2 weeks) and see how he does. I will keep you posted!

Oh, Hunter's Owner...She did mention sedation, but thought that Finn would need more, because he is sooo uncomfortable. He didn't just shiver, he cried, snapped, the whole lot! I will ask again just to make sure.

Nikki

Answer:
Originally Posted by nikkiandfinn

Oh, hunter's Owner...She did mention sedation, but thought that Finn would need more, because he is so uncomfortable. He didn't just shiver, he cried, snapped, the whole lot! I will ask again just to make sure.

Nikki

Good to hear that he isn't as stiff. Hopefully it will be even better by next week.

Yeah, better to put him under than to cause that much uncomfort.

Answer:
Is he on any kind of supplement? What food is he on? He should be on at least an adult food with lower calcium content (around 1%) and a joint supplement (glucosamine and chondroitin).

Answer:
Hi Nikki. Hope everything is going better with your puppy. I just wanted to throw in something regarding him not being able to walk well on hardwood floors. I know a lady whose dog just COULD NOT walk on the slick hardwood floors - he just couldn't grip it. She bought some of those doggy booties with the rubber bottoms and now he wears them all over the house. It looks funny but now she doesn't have to worry about him falling, especially since he's an older dog. You might want to look into it.

AndyFan35

Answer:
Hi everyone. Just wanted to give a little update on Finn. I have been trying desperately to keep him rested...impossible!!! I took him out side last night for a pee, and he went off running through the deep snow in the backyard! It's like a drug and he just has to have a hit!!! I yelled at him to come back, and he looked at me with these sad eyes, but reluctently returned.
It could be he injured or partially tore the ligaments in his knees, it can be a very expensive repair if it needs to be repaired surgically because the ligament tears all the way approx $3000 and enforced rest is very important, if it does get worse and surgery is needed, inorder to ensure proper healing and use of the knee later the dog will need 3 to 6 months of forced rest, and that means very strict crate rest, dogs can easily forget about pain when they get excited and cause a lot more damage to themselves, so it is up to you to enforce, and better to be doing for a few weeks rather than for a few months especially with an 8 month old

So you should be crating or keeping a dog in an xpen while in the house and keeping the dog on leash outside and should only be out long enough for a potty

Answer:
Copyright © 2007 - 2012 www.tendlife.com